1/26/16
Music Increases the Capacity of your Memory

Research has shown that both listening to music and playing a musical instrument stimulate your brain and can increase your memory.  A study was done in which 22 children from age 3 to 4 and a half years old were given either singing lessons or keyboard lessons. A control group of 15 children received no music lessons at all. Both groups participated in the same preschool activities. The results showed that preschoolers who had weekly keyboard lessons improved their spatial-temporal skills 34 percent more than the other children. Not only that, but researchers said that the effect lasted long-term.

(Source: http://brainconnection.positscience.com/topics/?main=fa/musiceducation2#A1)
 

According to an article from The Telegraph online magazine, "New research suggests that regularly playing an instrument changes the shape and power of the brain and may be used in therapy to improve cognitive skills." There is continually more evidence that musicians have organizationally and functionally different brains compared to non-musicians, especially in the areas of the brain used in processing and playing music. If you learn how to play an instrument, the parts of your brain that control motor skills (ex: using your hands, running, swimming, balancing, etc.), hearing, storing audio information, and memory actually grow and become more active. Other results show that playing an instrument can help your IQ increase by seven points.

(Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/sciencenews/6447588/Playing-a-musical-instrument-makes-you-brainier.html)
 
 
 
From an article entitled: 18 Benefits of Playing a Musical Instrument by Michael Matthews.
For full text of this article:  http://www.effectivemusicteaching.com/articles/directors/18-benefits-of-playing-a-musical-instrument/

1/24/16
Why Music Makes Our Brain Sing!

MUSIC is not tangible. You can’t eat it, drink it or mate with it. It doesn’t protect against the rain, wind or cold. It doesn’t vanquish predators or mend broken bones. And yet humans have always prized music — or well beyond prized, loved it.
 
In the modern age we spend great sums of money to attend concerts, download music files, play instruments and listen to our favorite artists whether we’re in a subway or salon. But even in Paleolithic times, people invested significant time and effort to create music, as the discovery of flutes carved from animal bones would suggest.
 
So why does this thingless “thing” — at its core, a mere sequence of sounds — hold such potentially enormous intrinsic value?
The quick and easy explanation is that music brings a unique pleasure to humans. Of course, that still leaves the question of why. But for that, neuroscience is starting to provide some answers.
 
More than a decade ago, our research team used brain imaging to showthat music that people described as highly emotional engaged the reward system deep in their brains — activating subcortical nuclei known to be important in reward, motivation and emotion. Subsequently we found that listening to what might be called “peak emotional moments” in music — that moment when you feel a “chill” of pleasure to a musical passage — causes the release of the neurotransmitter dopamine, an essential signaling molecule in the brain.
By ROBERT J. ZATORRE and VALORIE N. SALIMPOOR 
JUNE 7, 2013  
PUBLISHED IN THE NEW YORK TIMES, JUNE 9, 2013.  
AVAILABLE IN ITS ENTIRETY ONLINE.  SEE BELOW
For more on this article, including its complete contents, please go to:
 http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/09/opinion/sunday/why-music-makes-our-brain-sing.html